Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

ⁿSci[ence++] = pop(sci);

A science journal dedicated to the limitless complexity of nature.
Jun 8 '14
May 10 '14
"The audience actually wants to work for their meal. They just don’t want to know that they’re doing that. That’s your job as a storyteller is to hide the fact that you’re making them work for their meal. We’re born problem solvers. We’re compelled to deduce and to deduct because that’s what we do in real life. It’s this well-organized absence of information that draws us in."

Pixar filmmaker Andrew Stanton in an altogether fantastic episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour exploring what makes a great story

Complement with more secrets of storytelling from Vladimir Nabokov, Kurt Vonnegut and Neil Gaiman, then see the neurochemistry of storytelling and the dramatic art.

(via explore-blog)

May 4 '14

thenewenlightenmentage:

What is Gravity Made Of?

One of the most incredible physics discoveries of the century was just made. It reveals new secrets of gravity and the birth of our universe, called “inflation.” This video takes us back to the beginning of time and explains how quantum particles in the infant universe created a cosmic fingerprint that scientists can see today. This new evidence tells not only why the universe exploded outward during its birth, but also that gravity is made of quantum particles, called gravitons.

Apr 28 '14
kenobi-wan-obi:

Turbulent Black Holes Grow Fractal Skins As They Feed

Feeding black holes develop a fractal skin as they grow. That’s the conclusion of simulations that take advantage of a correlation between fluid dynamics and gravity.
"We showed that when you throw stuff into a black hole, the surface of the black hole responds like a fluid – and in particular, it can become turbulent," says Allan Adams at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "More precisely, the horizon itself becomes a fractal."
Fractals are mathematical sets that show self-similar patterns: zoom in on one part of a fractal drawing, like the famous Mandelbrot set, and the smaller portion will look nearly the same as the original image. Objects with fractal geometries show up all over nature, from clouds to the coast of England.
Adams and his colleagues have now found evidence that fractal behaviour occurs in an unexpected place: on the surface of a feeding black hole. Black holes grow by devouring matter that falls into them; the black hole at the centre of our galaxy is due to feast on a gas cloud later this year. But the details of how feeding black holes grow, and how this might affect their host galaxies, are still unknown.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Turbulent Black Holes Grow Fractal Skins As They Feed

Feeding black holes develop a fractal skin as they grow. That’s the conclusion of simulations that take advantage of a correlation between fluid dynamics and gravity.

"We showed that when you throw stuff into a black hole, the surface of the black hole responds like a fluid – and in particular, it can become turbulent," says Allan Adams at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "More precisely, the horizon itself becomes a fractal."

Fractals are mathematical sets that show self-similar patterns: zoom in on one part of a fractal drawing, like the famous Mandelbrot set, and the smaller portion will look nearly the same as the original image. Objects with fractal geometries show up all over nature, from clouds to the coast of England.

Adams and his colleagues have now found evidence that fractal behaviour occurs in an unexpected place: on the surface of a feeding black hole. Black holes grow by devouring matter that falls into them; the black hole at the centre of our galaxy is due to feast on a gas cloud later this year. But the details of how feeding black holes grow, and how this might affect their host galaxies, are still unknown.

Apr 23 '14
allofthemath:

So pretty…

allofthemath:

So pretty…

(Source: minimalmathconcepts)

Apr 23 '14

prostheticknowledge:

Quixter

First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.

To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:

Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]

Link to Quixter’s website can be found here

Apr 15 '14
ingenierodelmonton:

Así es como funcionan las demostraciones directas.
Q.E.D. bitches.

ingenierodelmonton:

Así es como funcionan las demostraciones directas.

Q.E.D. bitches.

(Source: iloveouterspace2k14)

Apr 6 '14

the-science-llama:

Bismuth Hopper Crystals
— Synthetically grown crystals of Bismuth form “Hopper crystals

In the formation of hopper crystals, the outer edges of the crystal grows faster than the interior edge, leading to these angular crystals with a stepped structure. Gaps also form in the middle because the inner crystals grow slower and don’t have time to fill up that region, forming the ”hopper cart” shape. This characteristic is known to occur in a number of other minerals and elements such as calcite, halite, gold, and even in water (snowflakes). There are even instructions online on how to grow your own crystals.

Mar 31 '14
Mar 26 '14

hyrodium:

The proof of Sum of Square Numbers!